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Tuesday, April 6

  1. page THE TIMELINE!!! edited Persian ​ THE TIMELINE Persian Empire End of Rashidun/Sunni,Shiite Al Andalus Start of Abbasid…
    Persian​ THE TIMELINE
    Persian
    Empire End of Rashidun/Sunni,Shiite Al Andalus Start of Abbasid Start of Seljuk
    6th
    6th Century
    End of Rashidun
    Caliphate 661 /Divide
    Sunni,Shiite Divide
    661
    Al Andalus
    711
    Start of Abbasid
    Caliphate 758
    Start of Seljuk
    Turks 11th Century
    _
    Start

    ​Start
    of Rashidun StartCaliphate 632
    Start
    of Ummayad EndCaliphate 661
    End
    of Ummayad StartCaliphate 750
    Start
    of Fatimid StartCaliphate 909
    Start
    of Almohads
    Caliphate 632 Caliphate 661 Caliphate 750 Caliphate 909
    1130
    End of Almohads Start1163
    Start
    of Saladin/ EndSaladin Ayyubids 1171
    End
    of Abbasid End of Saladin/ End of Seljuk
    1163 Ayyubids 1171 /
    Caliphate 1258
    End of Saladin
    Ayyubids 1341 /
    End of Seljuk
    Turks 14th
    ...
    of Fatimid StartCaliphate 1171
    Start
    of The Khanate End of the Khanate / Start of Ottoman End of Al Andalus
    Caliphate 1171
    of the Golden Horde 1259
    End of the Khanate
    of the Golden Horde /1359
    Start of Ottoman
    Empire 1359
    End of Al Andalus
    1492
    1259

    End of Ottoman StartEmpire 1520
    Start
    of Spread of
    Empire 1520
    Islam to Indonesia
    16th
    16th Century
    _

    Start of Mughal EndEmpire 1526
    End
    of Mugal
    Empire 1526
    Empire 1858

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    4:30 pm
  2. page Fatimid Caliphate edited ... ---- Summary of Rise of Empire and Major Military and Political accomplishments. ... were …
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    ----
    Summary of Rise of Empire and Major Military and Political accomplishments.
    ...
    were a “medieval Ismailimedieval Shii dynasty”dynasty who came to the North Africa from Arabia in 909 CE and heldgained power over a portion of land that
    ...
    the Sunni Dynasties theAbbasidsDynasties, the Abbasids and the Umayyads. This attempt was unsuccessfulUmayyads in both situations,Spain (Al Andalus). These attempts were unsuccessful, and the
    ...
    gradual weakness, the Saladin peopleand the Ayyubids faced no great challenge in
    Art, Music, Literature, Religious Ideas and Culture.
    Cairo,The Fatimid capital of Cairo, due to
    ...
    Indo-Mediterranean trade, soon became saturated
    ...
    itself as thea major center of Islamic Culture.culture. The part
    ...
    Islamic Art goesgoes, was the
    ...
    the Middle East.
    In
    East (see example below, a similar nature to the previously mentioned tolerance of visual art, Musicwooden beam from Fatimid Palace in Cairo depicting musicians.)
    {ISLAMIC_DB_1031315404.jpg}
    In a similarly tolerant vein, music
    was also encouraged by those of the Fatimid caliphate. Music
    ...
    Fatimid Caliphate Showedshowed itself to
    Cairo also boasted of its mosques and buildings that used similar styles as the local art. The al-Azhar mosque and its University became the Educational and Spiritual Centers of the area. The Religion centered around orthodox Sunni Beliefs. The Al-Azhar had a library of 200,000 manuscripts concerning law, logic, mathematics, astronomy, physics, and theology, all freely open to the public. Al-Azhar still stands as Cairo’s forefront university.
    The Islamic world was in discourse at the time much like in Umayyad times. The Islamic World needed a unifying force as the Abbasid Caliphate began to crumble. The Fatimid Caliphate answered this need with new knowledge and hopefully long lasting influence.
    ...
    Campo, Juan E. "Fatimid Dynasty." Facts on File. Facts on File Inc. , n.d. Web. 5 Apr 2010. <http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?>.
    Doak, Robin. "Islamic Empire, 750-1260." Facts on File. Facts on File, Inc. , n.d. Web. 5 Apr 2010. <http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?>.
    ...
    Web. <http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?>.
    Works Cited:
    Virani, Hanif. "The Rise and Decline of The Fatimid Empire."Ismaili.net. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Apr 2010.
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    3:13 pm
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  5. page Abbasid Caliphate edited ... By the early ninth century, many regions of the empire were practically independent, and the d…
    ...
    By the early ninth century, many regions of the empire were practically independent, and the division became greater as time went on. The Abbasid Caliphate was still ruling, however it had begun to splinter, weakening its power. By 945, the area around the Caliphate’s power base in Baghdad was lost and a feudal-type governance system of amirs took effect. Most leaders were, at least symbolically, loyal to the caliph as this was favorable in establishing legitimacy and gaining the approval of those who supported the caliphate. The exceptions to this were the Fatimid Caliphate and the remnants of the Umayyad Caliphate in al-Andalus . By the turn of the tenth century, the Abbasid had little more than symbolic power left. Even in the heart of the Abbasid dynasty, military leaders came by the 10th century to wield more power than the caliphs.
    {http://image.absoluteastronomy.com/images/encyclopediaimages/s/sh/shattering_isochamend.png} The splintering of the Abbasid into amirs
    ...
    Mongols invaded, utterly destroying Baghdad,
    ...
    of killing royalty -- by wrapping them in carpets and then trampling them to death.royalty. The surviving
    Works Cited
    Alles, Gregory D., and Robert S. Ellwood. "Sunni Islam." Encyclopedia of World
    (view changes)
    2:36 pm
  6. page Abbasid Caliphate edited ... The Abbasids overthrew the Ummayad Caliphate in the year 750, massacring every member of the d…
    ...
    The Abbasids overthrew the Ummayad Caliphate in the year 750, massacring every member of the dynasty that the could not catch (although one prominent member escaped to the al-Andalus region of what is now Spain.) Diverse and disaffected populations benefited the Abbasid rise to power. The Abassid family used the resentment of the common people for the Ummayad's elitism, decadence, and nepotism, as well as the anger of the Shi'ites, to their advantage. The Shi'ites helped them come to power, even though the Abbasids turned out to Sunni in orientation.
    The first caliph Abu I-Abbas ("the bloodthirsty") focused on first eliminating his enemies and gaining a strong foothold in what are now modern day Iraq and Iran. He proclaimed the family to have been chosen to rule by god. The second Caliph, al-Mansur, established the city of Baghdad as his capital. The period beginning with his reign and ending in the tenth century has been dubbed by many scholars the "golden age of Islam," where ideas and influences from other cultures flowed into the Islamic world and made for richer art, theology, literature, and technology. Unlike the Umayyad Dynasty, the Abbasids allowed non-Arabs to obtain prestigious positions within the empire, and the Abbasid Dynasty benefitted for several centuries from the vibrant exchange of ideas made possible by this tolerance.
    ...
    easier defense. Samarra’,Samarra’s Great Mosque, made in 836 containedCE, was one of
    {http://users.ox.ac.uk/~wolf0126/photos/samarra1.jpg} The Great Mosque of Samarra
    Art in the Abbasid Caliphate is relatively well-known, and includes items such as carpets, woven silks, and elaborate ceramics. These ceramics were of high enough quality to compete with the Chinese porcelain, and were painted with a green or cobalt blue glaze. These in turn were decorated with floral designs, stripes, and/or scenes from Arabic legends. This art form eventually expanded into intricate tiles as well.
    ...
    By the early ninth century, many regions of the empire were practically independent, and the division became greater as time went on. The Abbasid Caliphate was still ruling, however it had begun to splinter, weakening its power. By 945, the area around the Caliphate’s power base in Baghdad was lost and a feudal-type governance system of amirs took effect. Most leaders were, at least symbolically, loyal to the caliph as this was favorable in establishing legitimacy and gaining the approval of those who supported the caliphate. The exceptions to this were the Fatimid Caliphate and the remnants of the Umayyad Caliphate in al-Andalus . By the turn of the tenth century, the Abbasid had little more than symbolic power left. Even in the heart of the Abbasid dynasty, military leaders came by the 10th century to wield more power than the caliphs.
    {http://image.absoluteastronomy.com/images/encyclopediaimages/s/sh/shattering_isochamend.png} The splintering of the Abbasid into amirs
    ...
    of the Abbasid.Abbasid in their traditional manner of killing royalty -- by wrapping them in carpets and then trampling them to death. The surviving
    Works Cited
    Alles, Gregory D., and Robert S. Ellwood. "Sunni Islam." Encyclopedia of World
    (view changes)
    2:34 pm
  7. page Abbasid Caliphate edited ... {http://ocw.nd.edu/arabic-and-middle-east-studies/islamic-societies-of-the-middle-east-and-nor…
    ...
    {http://ocw.nd.edu/arabic-and-middle-east-studies/islamic-societies-of-the-middle-east-and-north/images/the-height-of-the-abbasid-empire} The Abbasid Caliphate at the height of its power
    The Rise and Accomplishments of the Abbasid:
    ...
    in orientation. While the Abassids later attempted to make peace with the moderate Shi'ites, these attempts were ineffective and eventually Shi'ite revolts led to conflicts.
    The first caliph Abu I-Abbas ("the bloodthirsty") focused on first eliminating his enemies and gaining a strong foothold in what are now modern day Iraq and Iran. He proclaimed the family to have been chosen to rule by god. The second Caliph, al-Mansur, established the city of Baghdad as his capital. The period beginning with his reign and ending in the tenth century has been dubbed by many scholars the "golden age of Islam," where ideas and influences from other cultures flowed into the Islamic world and made for richer art, theology, literature, and technology. Unlike the Umayyad Dynasty, the Abbasids allowed non-Arabs to obtain prestigious positions within the empire, and the Abbasid Dynasty benefitted for several centuries from the vibrant exchange of ideas made possible by this tolerance.
    Among this golden age’s many admirable achievements was its architecture. Baghdad, the power base of the Abbasid Caliphate built in 762, was constructed for the khalifah family on the west bank of the Tigris River. Unfortunately, much of Abbasid’s architecture has not survived to today, even though it was surrounded by high curved walls made of mud brick for easier defense. Samarra’, made in 836 contained one of the largest masjid (mosques) ever built; measuring 240 meters by 156 meters, covering 37,000 meters and capable of holding up to 60,000 worshipers. This architecture survives to this day, adorning a minaret with a spiral design known to many as a “stairway to heaven.”
    (view changes)
    2:15 pm
  8. page Abbasid Caliphate edited ... The Rise and Accomplishments of the Abbasid: The Abbasids overthrew the Ummayad Caliphate in …
    ...
    The Rise and Accomplishments of the Abbasid:
    The Abbasids overthrew the Ummayad Caliphate in the year 750, massacring every member of the dynasty that the could not catch (although one prominent member escaped to the al-Andalus region of what is now Spain.) Diverse and disaffected populations benefited the Abbasid rise to power. The Abassid family used the resentment of the common people for the Ummayad's elitism, decadence, and nepotism, as well as the anger of the Shi'ites, to their advantage. The Shi'ites helped them come to power, even though the Abbasids turned out to Sunni in orientation. While the Abassids later attempted to make peace with the moderate Shi'ites, these attempts were ineffective and eventually Shi'ite revolts led to conflicts.
    ...
    and technology. Unlike the Umayyad Dynasty, the Abbasids allowed non-Arabs to obtain prestigious positions within the empire, and the Abbasid Dynasty benefitted for several centuries from the vibrant exchange of ideas made possible by this tolerance.
    Among this golden age’s many admirable achievements was its architecture. Baghdad, the power base of the Abbasid Caliphate built in 762, was constructed for the khalifah family on the west bank of the Tigris River. Unfortunately, much of Abbasid’s architecture has not survived to today, even though it was surrounded by high curved walls made of mud brick for easier defense. Samarra’, made in 836 contained one of the largest masjid (mosques) ever built; measuring 240 meters by 156 meters, covering 37,000 meters and capable of holding up to 60,000 worshipers. This architecture survives to this day, adorning a minaret with a spiral design known to many as a “stairway to heaven.”
    {http://users.ox.ac.uk/~wolf0126/photos/samarra1.jpg} The Great Mosque of Samarra
    (view changes)
    2:14 pm
  9. page Abbasid Caliphate edited ... The Rise and Accomplishments of the Abbasid: The Abbasids overthrew the Ummayad Caliphate in …
    ...
    The Rise and Accomplishments of the Abbasid:
    The Abbasids overthrew the Ummayad Caliphate in the year 750, massacring every member of the dynasty that the could not catch (although one prominent member escaped to the al-Andalus region of what is now Spain.) Diverse and disaffected populations benefited the Abbasid rise to power. The Abassid family used the resentment of the common people for the Ummayad's elitism, decadence, and nepotism, as well as the anger of the Shi'ites, to their advantage. The Shi'ites helped them come to power, even though the Abbasids turned out to Sunni in orientation. While the Abassids later attempted to make peace with the moderate Shi'ites, these attempts were ineffective and eventually Shi'ite revolts led to conflicts.
    ...
    Abu I-Abbas ("the bloodthirsty") focused on first eliminating his enemies and gaining a
    Among this golden age’s many admirable achievements was its architecture. Baghdad, the power base of the Abbasid Caliphate built in 762, was constructed for the khalifah family on the west bank of the Tigris River. Unfortunately, much of Abbasid’s architecture has not survived to today, even though it was surrounded by high curved walls made of mud brick for easier defense. Samarra’, made in 836 contained one of the largest masjid (mosques) ever built; measuring 240 meters by 156 meters, covering 37,000 meters and capable of holding up to 60,000 worshipers. This architecture survives to this day, adorning a minaret with a spiral design known to many as a “stairway to heaven.”
    {http://users.ox.ac.uk/~wolf0126/photos/samarra1.jpg} The Great Mosque of Samarra
    (view changes)
    2:11 pm

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